A Tale of Two Roses

Rose One (no eraser)
Rose Two (with eraser)

In the ongoing process of making a better rose, at least in painting one, new tools are always being sought, tried and incorporated into the technique.  Art supply stores are the garden where new tools are harvested.  On one particular scouting expedition, I was overjoyed at what I thought would be a wonderful new tool for streamlining the under-drawing portion of the painting.

My favorite method of painting flowers is based on one of the techniques outlined in Botanical Illustration Course with The Eden Project.  In this technique, a complete pencil drawing is made that can be used as part of the layers of paint-washes speeding up the time to the finished piece.  I have experimented with different pencils and mark making applications and have come to a place where I am happy with that process.  But I still find it necessary to use a white eraser until I get the shading where I want it. (More on erasers in another post.) Occasionally, I’ll use the eraser to clean up the edges, as well.

While perusing the feast of erasers at the art supply store, my eyes hit on a battery operated power eraser complete with white eraser inserts. My heart jumped with excitement imagining faster and more productive painting.  I couldn’t wait to get home to try it out. As soon as I got home, I pulled out watercolor paper and started what would be a red rose. The eraser worked so well, I used it more.  I became almost careless with the drawing because I could clean it up so much more quickly. And then my newfound excitement began to shrink.

The first thing I noticed was the paint was pooling up and not spreading smoothly.  As it dried, I started to see splotching. As the painting progressed, it became evident that the eraser had erased large portions of the “tooth” of the paper. This particular tool would not be as useful as I thought.  It would be great in drawings not intended for painting, but would not be helpful in making an under-painting drawing.  It’s back to the drawing board to start over.

Moral to this story: there is just no substitution for good drawing.

Follow the link here for more on The Eden Project.

Get the book from The Eden Project

or from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Botanical-Illustration-Course-Eden-Project/dp/0713490748


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