Zooming Botanical Painting

“All you need to paint is a few tools, a little instruction, and a vision in your mind.” 
― Bob Ross

Adapting to new ways of teaching has been my focus for the past two months. Yesterday was the first Zoom workshop in Botanical watercolor. It went amazingly well. It was not as difficult as I had imagined. This could be a very good way of teaching for a number of reasons. For this first workshop, the participants were artists I had worked with previously, so their styles were all familiar.

Yellow flowers were the best option for this trial because they required fewer glazes of color. The workshop was held to a two hour format. Two people were able to completely finish their paintings except for some minor finishing touches. The other two were more than halfway to completion. For future workshops, I believe the 2 hour format is probably best but depending on the type of flower and whether or not the artists are beginners or advanced. More complicated flowers could be a series of 2 hour workshops. Beginners could be offered a series as well.

All in all, the zooming was a great platform for teaching botanical art. I am excited to set up some more. Additionally in the works, is a gallery page for workshop attendees to showcase their work here! The guide to daffodil painting will soon be available, as well.

Looking forward to this new adventure! All suggestions welcome!!

The Eden Project and Botanical Painting

For years my favorite book for teaching Botanical painting has been, Botanical Illustration Course with The Eden Project, by Rosie Martin and Meriel Thurstan.  The ease of following the book’s guidelines, the abundant illustrations, and demonstrations have made it my go-to textbook.  Sadly, I have just found that it is no longer in print and will soon be very difficult to get.  

Barnes and Noble found two copies for me.  Amazon still has a number of them available in new, used and hardcover. British bookseller, The Book Depository also has some copies available. Get one while you still can. It’s a great book for methods and materials of botanical watercolor painting in a simplified and easy to follow format.  Currently, I am in the process of finding a substitute that will work in its place.  In the meantime, I’ll keep using it until all available copies are gone.

One of my dreams has been to visit The Eden Project in Cornwall in the U.K. with a group of botanical artists.  From all accounts it is truly a remarkable place.  The amazing story as told on the website is of the transformation of an abandoned porcelain quarry repurposed to provide habitat for an array of plants from all over the planet.  Biosphere domes shelter the plants in two basic climates: rainforest and Mediterranean.  

Along with the plant life, The Eden Project provides educational opportunities for all ages in wide ranging topics from gardening tips to university degrees in subjects such as Horticulture, Land and Ecological Restoration and Sustainable Tourism. Many recreational opportunities are also available. You can opt for a Zip wire adventure, a visit to the Myth and Folklore garden where you might encounter a fairy or two, or spend time taking in the scents from the perfume garden.  Concerts and festivals are held frequently throughout the summer months.  A trip to The Eden Project includes lots activities for the kids and even an adventure for you and your dog. 

Someday I may make it to The Eden Project.  If you are fortunate enough to go, please share your adventure with me. I’d love to hear about it. In the meantime, happy painting!

A Tale of Two Roses

Rose One (no eraser)
Rose Two (with eraser)

In the ongoing process of making a better rose, at least in painting one, new tools are always being sought, tried and incorporated into the technique.  Art supply stores are the garden where new tools are harvested.  On one particular scouting expedition, I was overjoyed at what I thought would be a wonderful new tool for streamlining the under-drawing portion of the painting.

My favorite method of painting flowers is based on one of the techniques outlined in Botanical Illustration Course with The Eden Project.  In this technique, a complete pencil drawing is made that can be used as part of the layers of paint-washes speeding up the time to the finished piece.  I have experimented with different pencils and mark making applications and have come to a place where I am happy with that process.  But I still find it necessary to use a white eraser until I get the shading where I want it. (More on erasers in another post.) Occasionally, I’ll use the eraser to clean up the edges, as well.

While perusing the feast of erasers at the art supply store, my eyes hit on a battery operated power eraser complete with white eraser inserts. My heart jumped with excitement imagining faster and more productive painting.  I couldn’t wait to get home to try it out. As soon as I got home, I pulled out watercolor paper and started what would be a red rose. The eraser worked so well, I used it more.  I became almost careless with the drawing because I could clean it up so much more quickly. And then my newfound excitement began to shrink.

The first thing I noticed was the paint was pooling up and not spreading smoothly.  As it dried, I started to see splotching. As the painting progressed, it became evident that the eraser had erased large portions of the “tooth” of the paper. This particular tool would not be as useful as I thought.  It would be great in drawings not intended for painting, but would not be helpful in making an under-painting drawing.  It’s back to the drawing board to start over.

Moral to this story: there is just no substitution for good drawing.

Follow the link here for more on The Eden Project.

Get the book from The Eden Project

or from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Botanical-Illustration-Course-Eden-Project/dp/0713490748

Poetic Musings

Seagull at sunset

“I want to paint the way a bird sings.” Claude Monet

Sometimes I wish I could compose beautiful poetry.  If I could, I’d write some lines about the beauty of a bird in flight, the graceful curve of the wing, the focused determination in the eye, head down, feet up. There is just something magical in the sight of a bird soaring through the air that begs for poetry.

If I could be a storyteller, I’d make up a story about the birds chattering in the trees and swooping down to the feeder to snatch a morsel or two.  I wonder if they talk to each other?  They make funny little noises when they congregate in the trees around the feeder.  I imagine them gossiping about who’s hogging all the seed or who flew off for a few days and didn’t tell the others where they were going or whose feathers were looking a little shabby.  Can cardinals understand the chatter of chickadees? Do finches converse with sparrows?

Since I am not a poet or a storyteller, I paint birds. Sometimes I paint the single bird in a stance I believe to be a pose for the camera.  At other times, I paint them in groups or pairs and arrange them as though they are conversing.  While I paint them, I imagine what they are thinking and what would they say if they could talk? Maybe they do talk. I just don’t understand bird language.

Since joining the American Birding Association, I am learning more about different birds and bird behavior.  My camera has become a constant companion as I wander around searching for subjects to paint.  Every now and then, I capture the image of one I don’t know so I go to the ABA’s bird identification Facebook page, “What’s this Bird?” I post the image. The identification returns quickly and my bird knowledge expands.

As I learn more about which bird is which and why one swoops and another soars, I’ll go on wondering if they talk amongst themselves or if they concentrate on each flight and not on what their companions are doing?  Maybe a story will come to me. Or possibly some lines of poetry will pop into my head.  Perhaps a painting will be a poem one day or possibly tell a story. Paraphrasing Monet, I hope to paint like birds fly. In the meantime, I’ll just keeping painting.

New Year’s Resolution: More Stealing

You stealing from me???

“Good artists copy, great artists steal,” Picasso as quoted from “Real Artists Don’t Starve” by Jeff Goins

A couple of weeks ago, I was standing around in a FedEx Office store waiting for the computer guy to finish my project when in the distance I spotted the word, “Artists” in the title of a book on the rack where there are usually books on sales and other business type information.  “Artists” is never a featured word in the title of sales and business books. It just isn’t done.  Artists aren’t considered business types. We’re too flakey, or whatever, to be taken seriously by the business world.  I moved in for a closer look.

And guess what??? It was a business book, believe it or not, for artists! Oh Glory!  I couldn’t believe my eyes.  Of course I had to buy it!  Not just because it was for the business of artists, the title was so intriguing too!  The book is called, “Real Artists Don’t Starve,” and even better, it is written by fellow Nashvillian, Jeff Goins.  So far it is a red meat book for all artists.  I haven’t gone far in the book because I am caught up in Chapter Two.  Most likely, I will re-read this chapter a few times before progressing to Chapter Three, because it is so good. Chapter Two encourages artists to steal from other artists.

Stealing???  I’m shocked! Scare bleu!  (To steal a phrase from Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot.)  A deeper dive into the second chapter and I find I have been stealing since my very first painting when I was eight years old. That first painting was stolen from Van Gogh and I have been stealing ever since.  After Van Gogh, I have stolen from my other idols like Degas, Bonnard, Wolf Khan and Georgia O’Keefe.  And that’s just for starters!  The list gets really long, when it moves to today’s contemporary artists.

Goins point is, as he quotes from the bible, “There is nothing new under the sun.”  And he’s right.  There isn’t. The wise artist sees that. According to Goins, we spend a lot of wasted time trying to be original without realizing who we are as artists is original!  Unless you are a forger, most likely you are not copying exactly but are taking pieces from another artist, or artists, to create something new. We learn from those who have gone before.  We honor those who inspire us when we spend time copying from them.  More than that, when you follow a teacher’s direction, you are stealing ideas and techniques from that teacher. And that’s a good thing!

This New Year, I am resolving to do more stealing!

Happy stealing, to you, for the coming year!!

You can pick up a copy of “Real Artists Don’t Starve” at Amazon, Barnes and Noble here, or from Goins web site: www.goinswriter.com

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/real-artists-dont-starve-jeff-goins/1125138266

https://goinswriter.com

Treasuring Fall Risks

autumn leaves (1)

Fall appears to be taking its sweet time this year.  The colors have been changing for about four weeks or so, as far as I can tell. I picked up the first red leaf I saw weeks ago and brought it home to press in my favorite leaf presser book, Art Through The Ages.As the weeks have progressed, more and more leaves have found their way into the pages of the book.  Fall leaves are like seashells.  You can’t pick up just one. There is always another beauty to be brought home.  I keep going until the book won’t close well anymore. Then I have to switch to pine cones, acorns and other fall treasures.  My intent with all of these treasures is to make paintings and drawings of them. Some of them, I actually get the time to make the painting!

The leaf painting above is one of my favorites but each leaf presented a different issue to be worked through.  The yellow maple leaves had green still bleeding through the veins and bits of brown in odd places.  The red maple leaves were slightly testy in achieving the right shade of red-orange.  But the Bradford pear leaves were undoubtedly the most challenging.  I prefer using a complimentary color for shading in most cases, but the pear leaves were just not getting there with green shadows on the deep, dark red. Finally, in desperation, I resorted to phthalo Blue.  Bingo!  It was the right color for shading the strong red of Bradford pear leaves. Usually, I stay away from any of the phthalos except in extreme circumstances because their strong staining color is so unforgiving.  Once it’s on, it’s on to stay!  If the phthalo ruined the pear leaves then the whole painting was gone because they were the last leaves. This felt like that extreme moment! I took a deep breath and dove in. Risks can be so fun when they work! When they don’t, not so much.  But then you can’t have the fun without the risk!

As fall fades into winter, the last of the leaves will be dropping.  I took the camera out for one last sweep of the fall colors since the art history book is now overstuffed and there’s no more shelf space for pinecones.  Soon it will be time for the winterberries and glossy holly leaves. I think I’ll take another risk or two with fall treasures before starting on winter.

Happy treasure hunting for “risky” fall paintings!